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New minor gains national attention: Journal gives UNKs public health minor recognition
DeAnn Reed
Antelope Staff
Photo by DeAnn Reed
Dr. Debra Mowry helped create the minor for the biology and health science department.

The new UNK public health minor focuses on just that. Dr. Debra Mowry, who is a part of the biology and health science department, helped develop the minor. Through classes located in Bruner Hall, students are taught the importance of health issues as it relates to the public, insurance, business and health care policy.

“The university actually started thinking about this several years ago, about 2004," Mowry said. 

She said the university understood what was going on in the world of health. Many health issues like West Nile Virus were already playing a big part in public health, and the school already had over 500 students enrolled in health sciences. The public health minor just seemed to be a natural step for the school. 

Mowry said that the minor is to help compliment a student’s major, “…if they were a biology major, then perhaps they could help work with developing new vaccinations. If you were a business major…this would help you a get job working in the hospital or nursing home.”

The minor, according to Mowry, would also help students be better citizens. She said it would give them insight into public health care polices and how they impact the community. Mowry also said she hopes that as students educate themselves about public health they will get involved in shaping public health issues.

The program has gained national attention through a journal article in Peer Review. The magazine focuses on, “Emerging trends and key debates in undergraduate education.” Colleges from all over the country are featured in the magazine. 

Mowry said she believes the best way to encourage students to enroll in the program is for them to understand the importance of their own health. “I think the most important person in the world is you, and what better way to take care of you than to learn about you and learn about your health, what choices you have and what’s out there in the public that might help you.” 

student’s major, “…if they were a biology major, then perhaps they could help work with developing new vaccinations. If you were a business major…this would help you a get job working in the hospital or nursing home.”

The minor, according to Mowry, could also help students be better citizens. She said it will give them insight into public health care polices and how they impact the community. Mowry also said she hopes that as students educate themselves about public health they will get involved in shaping public health issues.

The program has gained national attention through a journal article in Peer Review. The magazine focuses on, “Emerging trends and key debates in undergraduate education.” Colleges from all over the country are featured in the magazine. 

Mowry said she believes the best way to encourage students to enroll in the program is for them to understand the importance of their own health. “I think the most important person in the world is you, and what better way to take care of you than to learn about you and learn about your health, what choices you have and what’s out there in the public that might help you.” 


Video by DeAnn Reed
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